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Can someone help with decoding this?

Discussion in 'Bay Tech Clinic' started by Petra, Nov 4, 2019.

  1. Petra

    Petra Member

    Messages:
    48
    Location:
    North Brisbane
    Hi all,

    Gosh I’m trying to decode this chassis number so I can find out the history of my new girl but I can’t seem to work it out can anyone help?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. tintop

    tintop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    561
    Location:
    Canberra
    Hi Petra,
    23 = Kombi,
    5 = 1975 in this case,
    2141736 = 141736th made in 75

    9/75
    2 seater
     
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  3. Petra

    Petra Member

    Messages:
    48
    Location:
    North Brisbane
    Thank you!! Is there any way I can tell where it came from? And the history?
     
  4. Wayne murray

    Wayne murray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,082
    Location:
    Seven hills
    Engine bay left hand side gives you the chassis number from Germany and is a complete knock-down (CKD) in Australia and there is second strip with numbers to Id Australian number .
     
  5. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    16,010
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Your bus was assembled and rolled off a production line in Victoria, from local and imported components.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2019
  6. Petra

    Petra Member

    Messages:
    48
    Location:
    North Brisbane
    Made in Australia? Interesting!!
     
    David H likes this.
  7. Wayne murray

    Wayne murray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,082
    Location:
    Seven hills
    Made in Germany reassembled and completed in Australia
     
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  8. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,175
    Location:
    newcastle
    The best ones;).
    Cheers
     
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  9. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    16,010
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Makes it sound like a fully built vehicle, then dismantled, then freighted, to be “reassembled” elsewhereo_O

    They were more like “flat pack” parts, freighted and then “assembled” elsewhere.

    Not like the later fully imported, made in Germany vehicles. ;)
     
    syncro likes this.
  10. syncro

    syncro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,446
    Location:
    Southern Highlands
    As Grant said. Parts were shipped to Australia and assembled and painted here. Some of the parts were locally sourced. (tyres,batteries,seats etc.) The paint colours were Australian only. Yours looks like Wattle.
     
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  11. Wayne murray

    Wayne murray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,082
    Location:
    Seven hills
    May be not worded correctly,I see it as built in Germany as most of the parts body wise where made in Germany. Whether the car was assembled as a shell(frame) and sent to Australia Is the interpretation I get from them already having a chassis number on them from Germany. The birth certificate that you get from Germany(which I think is wrong) Has it down as been painted and which it gets repainted once in Australia. This may be wrong:oops:
    yes not like the fully imported vehicles when they started again in 77.
     
  12. syncro

    syncro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,446
    Location:
    Southern Highlands
    They are not a shell, but individual panels and unpainted. Like an Ikea flat pack. They just come as boxes of parts. That is why we have crossover models here. Our Microbuses are really Kombis with seats. The chassis numbers were stamped in Australia.
     
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  13. Wayne murray

    Wayne murray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,082
    Location:
    Seven hills
    My mistake:oops: understanding of what was done:oops:
     
  14. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    16,010
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    That is the way I understand the process happened. ^^^

    Like reading labels on food stuffs in shops today: Rather than “Made in Germany”, it’s more like “Made in Australia, from local and imported ingredients.” ;)
    I just have to ask, :confused: why are they “the best ones”, over the fully imported ones built in Germany? :rolleyes:

    Is that just because you own one.........? o_O

    Only the later second generation, and all the third generation kombi’s were designed AND built in Germany.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2019
  15. syncro

    syncro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,446
    Location:
    Southern Highlands
    Early T1s and early T2s were fully imported.

    Australian made were definitely not the best ones. They were very poorly made. Some parts of the paint on my '74 looked like sandpaper. A few weeks after I bought it the shock absorbers fell off.
     
  16. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,175
    Location:
    newcastle
    Chase thru these threads. Somewhere in there (I think) 1500king talks about the steel my bus was made of:).
    http://forums.kombiclub.com/threads/freshly-rebuilt-engine-oil-light-on.54367/page-4
    Cheers
     
  17. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,175
    Location:
    newcastle
    Found 1500King comments in my files finally;) answering my question of why my bus didn't rust? From feb 2017 maybe.

    "Well, it comes down to;


    Impurities in the steel, like Carbon and Manganese, obviously comes at a much higher cost to remove more of both if they are distinctly excessive in the ore. More carbon results in faster rust due to the electron carrying ability of the carbon. Manganese is less active than steel, therefore the steel becomes the 'sacrificial anode', the subject of the corrosion as electrons are ripped from it to preserve the Manganese. Exposure to oxygen and water assists in electron travel from one to the other..... In a nutshell, paint it well and make sure that it is not a 70's Alfa Romeo or Fiat(Russian highly impure steel!)!!

    Bad wiring that allows electron leakdown through the body will assist preserving the more active Magnesium/Aluminium alloys in a Vee Dub... Keep it tidy and sort out gremlins! Bad/leaky batteries that provide the "Salt bridge" to the body from leaking posts is a no no.. The Alternator will help push the issue along without frying anything. Keep it all in good nick, good quality non-leaky sealed battery(Stay away from 'Supercharge Batteries, they are the worst and will hemorrhage even if you look at them!!).."

    He goes on to suppose Swedish ore & Swedish steel mill.
    Reckon the German imports from start 77 were from a different steel mill & ore.
    So that's what I've found out about 76 Kombi steel:).

    Apologies Petra we occasionally randomly hijack members threads;).

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2019
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  18. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,964
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Biggest factor is environment.
    Coastal air.
    Don't use dishwashing detergent or chlorine bleach to clean dirty vans.
     
  19. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,175
    Location:
    newcastle
    Whilst I agree @cbus with your comment I'm pretty sure biggest factor is composition of steel;). Thus stainless 4 grades etc. The environment just wants to return it to it's base elements! The manufacture hopes to slow that down & I agree with all that a good coat of paint helps that:D. My s/s water tanks are 316 stainless. No magnet sticks to them;) & are no longer an anode to my bus as they have no contact.
    Put a bit of aluminium sheet under your battery tray folks;).
    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019
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  20. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,964
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    The subject was mild steel as used in car bodies.
    I agree that high carbon steels are more prone to rusting but most car bodies have been low carbon ( probably 0.3 % and less )as high carbon steels are more difficult to press.
    Stainless is an entirely different animal.

    Chlorine ions are much more effective in creating rust.
    Aluminium sheet under a battery is an effective method of producing copious amounts of hydrogen .
     

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