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Electronic fuel pumps

Discussion in 'Fuel System & Electrics' started by Dominic Molluso, Aug 23, 2020.

  1. Dominic Molluso

    Dominic Molluso Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Moama
    Hi all just wanting some advise as to what sort of electronic fuel pump I need for my 1974 2lt auto supra
    It currently has an old ECCO electric pump

    Thanks heaps
    Dominic
     
  2. Alpal

    Alpal Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,785
    Location:
    Melbourne Bend of Islands
    KahunaKombi likes this.
  3. T1 Terry

    T1 Terry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,492
    Location:
    Mannum South Australia
    I'm guessing this isn't a Kombi 2 ltr motor with fuel injection that has been fitted into a '74 kombi, but rather a Toyota Supra? Did they make Supra's in '74?

    T1 Terry
     
  4. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    17,338
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    I thought that at first, but I think “spell check” may have interfered with the typing of “Sopru” camper. ;)

    https://forums.kombiclub.com/threads/new-member.58331/#post-657121
     
  5. T1 Terry

    T1 Terry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,492
    Location:
    Mannum South Australia
    Ah, yes, should have thought of that .... the electronic fuel pump also threw me, had my brain on the electronic fuel injection path, the 2ltr as well, a '74 came out with an 1800.
    Back to the original broadcast :lol:

    T1 Terry
     
  6. Dominic Molluso

    Dominic Molluso Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Moama
    Yes sorry for the lack of detail the kombi has a 2lt with dual solex carbi’s. Auto transmission.
    It originally had an 1800 motor in it.
    Not a Toyota..

    So I have taken the old ECCO electronic fuel pump out and replaced it with a Carter 4 psi low pressure fuel pump and it seems to work a treat.
    Is it necessary to install a pressure regulator and safety switch?
     
  7. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,865
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    What model pump.?
    Does it mention internal regulation for pressure?
    Fuel shutoff when not operating?
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2020
  8. Barry

    Barry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,946
    Location:
    Abbotsford NSW
    you should at least check the pressure.

    you definitely need a cut off.
    Otherwise you keep pumping when stalled/on.
    Not good in accidents etc
     
    cbus likes this.
  9. Dominic Molluso

    Dominic Molluso Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Moama
    The new fuel pump is a Carter P4070
    The spec mentions no regulator required
     
  10. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,865
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    By any details I can find I would check pressure and limit to max 4 psi if needed.
    Being rotary I'm guessing no shutoff ability so certainly a tachometric relay for running it and prodent to fit a lock off from that as well to prevent siphoning which is quite common

    Relay and shutoff with solenoid about $50 ish EA.
    Don't use an empi pressure regulator.

    All worthwhile for peace of mind.
     
  11. T1 Terry

    T1 Terry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,492
    Location:
    Mannum South Australia
    I'll second the post from cbus, a must really if you want to use an electric fuel pump, it must stop when the engine stops turning much the same way as the original mechanical pump did. The fuel cut off solenoid stops that flooding when a hot engine is stopped for 10 mins or so, the built up pressure between the pump and the needle and seat will continue to be applied and any dribbling will result in fuel flowing out of the carby venturi and flooding the engine.
    Combining this set up with a hidden switch makes a great anti theft device as well and it can even be used to drain the carbies when parking up for a while or when the vehicle is out in the hot sun with a hot engine to stop the fuel from boiling in the carbies and creating that really hard restart. You just need to remember to turn it back on, had a rather embarrassing incident at a road works along the Hay plains, started and stopped and wouldn't restart :oops:

    T1 Terry
     
  12. Mordred

    Mordred Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,905
    Location:
    Penna, Hobart
    Peel CP30 tachometric relay from many sources for the cutoff switch. easy to fit. I would use it to switch a relay to reduce the load on the ignition switch when using with a solenoid valve and pump. Connect the power feed for them through the relay with a fuse straight from the battery, then power the CP30 from the positive of the coil with the sense wire to the negative of the coil.

    Hope that makes sense.

    Adrian
     
  13. KahunaKombi

    KahunaKombi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    21,535
    Location:
    Bracken Ridge, Qld
    4psi if constant seems high for dual solex :rolleyes: ..... but may be wrong.
    I had dual 40 Dellortto's running off a Peirburg fuel pump and up to 4 psi regulator BUT had it set to 2psi (max 2.5psi) ;) as this where the carbies seemed to be their happiest :D.
    So worth checking out if possible what/where the solex's are happy o_O
     
    cbus likes this.
  14. T1 Terry

    T1 Terry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,492
    Location:
    Mannum South Australia
    My poor old rattle pump Facet pump is rated between 4psi and 7 psi, I've never had an issue with flooding when leaving the ignition on but the engine not running because the tachometric relay will shut the pump down after a few seconds. It never floods idling and doesn't run out of fuel when revving the engine hard on a long hill climb towing a heavy trailer full of solar panels. The mechanical pump would not keep up with the fuel demand and a top end lean out often occurred because the carbies were running out of fuel.
    I do run the Kombi mostly on LPG, but sometimes I need to switch back to petrol because I have pulled so much gas through the converter is freezes up allowing liquid LPG starts to flow into the mixer venturi, air cleaner cross over pipes and eventually through the carbies freezing the lot of them, then the splutters start because the liquid is entering the intake manifolds and expanding 280 time when it becomes a gas and the air ends up getting excluded to a large extent.
    I have to run a bit with no fuel to allow all the liquid to expand into a gas, then flick the electric pump on/off/on a bit to finish clearing the gas out, then on to petrol. The petrol defrosts the carbies very quickly and gradually all the parts up line defrost.
    The higher output of this pump allows for very fast carbie bowl filling so the switch over can be done while driving, kinda important because the momentum helps keep the engine spinning to get the excess fuel out.

    T1 Terry
     
  15. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,865
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Have you done a pressure test on the pump.
    A good mate was owner of a spares business supplyingt tomost of the local garages and public.
    After a few issues they tested the pumps in stock $40-70 range facet types ) and found pressures all over the place .
    From memory a few up around 30psi.?
    Supposed to be the carb/ 4psi type.
    So all went back.
     
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  16. Mordred

    Mordred Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,905
    Location:
    Penna, Hobart
    The pierburg (company that made the original pumps) 3-5 PSI lift pump that is a rotary vane design are much better than those rattle pumps. Not cheap at nearly $150 but good quality.

    BTW the Peel CP30 has runs the pump automatically for a few seconds when the ignition comes on so I dont know why you would need to add a bypass unless you require it to run longer. Up to you I guess.

    Adrian
     
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  17. T1 Terry

    T1 Terry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,492
    Location:
    Mannum South Australia
    The pump pressure in the Facet type pumps is easy enough to adjust ... well sort of, it depends on the spring pressure on the inlet end of the pump that acts against the piston. It is the spring that pushes the piston up to pressurise the fuel, as it passes through the magnetic field produced by the windings under that cube shaped cover it gets thrown back to the intake end. If the fuel pressure is equal to the spring pressure, the piston is held at the supply end until the pressure drops.
    As far as the run time of the pump, initial turn on should run the pump for a few seconds, this is a function of the tachometric relay, then when sufficient pulse signals are sensed from the ignition, it turns the pump on and stays on until either the power supply is cut or there are insufficient ignition pulses sensed. A few on/off/on of the ignition switch will generally prime the carbies. With the rattle pump, you can actually hear when the pressure build up a bit because the noise is less.

    T1 Terry
     
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