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Finding VW Part Number

Discussion in 'Bay Tech Clinic' started by Mr Beckstar, Apr 3, 2018.

  1. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    A bit of a geeky question, but wondering if anyone knows how to find the right VW part number from the illustrated catalogue shown below. Perhaps I'm missing pages?? Or perhaps it's only on microfische? Someone out there must know...

    716BEC23-844D-44BD-9324-2D6191C32A56.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2018
  2. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    Hmmmm, struggling to upload the pic. Normally no problem. Perhaps the network here is interfering. I'll try again tonight.
     
  3. syncro

    syncro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,034
    Location:
    Southern Highlands
    What is the part?
     
  4. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    It's a muffler. If you heard Harry running you may have heard the rattling in his rear end. I think the baffles have come loose inside as there's nothing loose around the back. I want to get a muffler that's either NOS ($$$ and probably made from unobtainium) or as close to original as possible. There are different VW muffler types; the picture will help describe what I'm after. I was thinking of doing a google/ebay search of the VW part number.

    Yes, I know places like VW Heritage, Just Kampers, Bus Stop, Vintage VW, etc advertise these things but I guess that's also raises a rhetorical question; how close to original are they?
     
  5. syncro

    syncro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,034
    Location:
    Southern Highlands
    What engine?

    Yes I understand that you want quality and originality. Try talking to places like Vintage VW, Mick Motors etc and here their opinions. You are liable to order one from overseas and it ends up being the same as JKs or Tooleys ones. Ernst were always a reasonable brand but not as long lasting as VW.
     
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  6. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    It’s a 2 litre twin carb automatic without EGR.

    Here’s the pic finally. My muffler is like item 1.

    9559D2E4-09EB-427E-8842-B4F76258A456.jpeg
     
  7. Wayne murray

    Wayne murray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,078
    Location:
    Seven hills
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2018
  8. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    Location:
    newcastle
    Oh ..my:eek:. Plus freight. Just sell the other kidney MrBeckstar;).
    Cheers (or not:()
     
  9. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    The link is good; thanks for that. But how do I know whether I need 025 251 053 B or 025 251 053 P? I guess that’s the point why I’m looking for somewhere to find the VW part number.
     
  10. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    But you said your OEM exhaust was still the original after, what, 42 years?? Plus, it fits and works properly. That’s money well spent!
     
  11. Wayne murray

    Wayne murray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,078
    Location:
    Seven hills
    B is a Ernest muffler from a VW spare parts place and P is from VW classic OEM part .I seen NOS one with sticker on it and it had P as the last digit .P would be correct.The nos one wanted 400 euros plus freight.Ring bus stop vw in Qld. See what is available.
     
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  12. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    Location:
    newcastle
    It's fuel injected:D! That makes a difference to a few things;). One big one with all engines & peripheries is heat:oops:!!!! It lasts longer if you don't melt/hurt it with heat cycles:rolleyes:. The lower the temp cycle the less the wear/damage:p.
    As I said during the w/e when you took the temp of your new engine & mine @ Tamworth. 100c for fuel injected & 124c for your new engine. There is something we're not seeing as the temp hasn't changed since the rebuild on yours & with new carbs. Still too hot:(.
    Yes it is & even I'm astounded but there are a few things in play here with old boy that relate to his longevity;).

    Low heat due fuel injection :D (correct set up) & operating temp. I get twice the mileage out of F/I than I got out of carbs between rebuilds:cool:.

    Total 'electrolytic' outcome of his build:).

    Good seam sealers used on mid 75 to end 76 (a rust thing):p

    Ore & clean steel from Sweden;).

    We're missing something that must be obvious:(. My only thought is that slippery trans making engine work harder:confused:?

    All with passion & no emoji's! But geez I could have done a dozen in this post.

    Post edit at your request. Some emoji:cool:.

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2018
  13. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    I miss your artistic use of emojis :(;)
     
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  14. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    Well it looks like the correct part number is identified :D
     
  15. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    Location:
    newcastle
    :):D
    I'll rework it;).
    Cheers
     
  16. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    Location:
    newcastle
    How's that?;). Prettier:oops:?
    Cheers
     
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  17. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    I was reasonably happy to see the infrared heat gun measurement at 124 deg C; that’s a big improvement compared to previous. For example, I saw 135 deg C on the gauge as I crossed the Hawkesbury River Bridge on the way down to Fairfield for the Nationals last winter after trying to nurse it the whole way and it was about 8 deg C ambient that morning. :eek:

    I think I’ve worked out what is happening there with the gauge. Here’s an explanation. Hopefully not a confusing explanation :confused:

    The previous owner’s setup was good for getting an accurate oil temperature reading, as proven by my infrared temp gun verification. The lower right front tinware (I.e. next to the fuel pump) was missing, so cool air could enter this tinware hole, mix with the warm air coming off the cylinders and pass by the end of the temperature sensor (located adjacent to the thermostat - which was also missing) without heating up the end of the temperature sensor significantly. Unfortunately, this setup was only good for reliable oil temperature measurement and not good for proper cooling of cylinders, proper operation of the thermostat or protection of the fuel pump from excessive heat.

    Whilst my temperature readings on the gauge didn’t reduce over the weekend, I did notice the gauge reading does not match the infrared gun reading like it used to do. I think the reason for this is that I’ve added the missing lower right front tinware I mentioned above. This prevents any cool air getting near the thermostat (meaning the thermostat works!) but it also means the air flowing past the end of the temperature sensor is all coming straight off the heads/cylinders/exhausts and therefore it’s really hot. So, I’ve determined that all this extra hot air is heating up the end of the sensor and that heat is actually being conducted to the other end of the sensor (i.e. the end in the oil) and thus giving a hotter temperature measurement than the actual oil temperature. In some ways I’m averaging the oil temperature against the heat being rejected from the barrels/heads/exhaust rather than measuring oil temperature alone. It makes sense that when Harry is driven on the freeway, more heat is going to be rejected in the air flow. At least, that’s what I was telling myself when I saw 150 deg C on the gauge (measured as 125 deg C oil temp at the taco plate).

    So, the plan is to move the temperature sensor to the taco plate out of the above mentioned very hot air flow.
     
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  18. Mr Beckstar

    Mr Beckstar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    702
    Location:
    Bateau Bay, NSW
    Much better :)o_O:rolleyes::cool::D:p
     
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  19. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    Location:
    newcastle
    (i.e. the end in the oil)
    Now that makes some sense;).
    So air can be hotter than oil..... you might be onto it with this. You've got to love it when the temp sender is the item heating the oil:rolleyes::p.
    Sounds like you could benefit from a temp sense dip stick! Yeah...they make them & connect into a 'shut down' situation if too high. Could make the trouble shooting easier:);).
    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=kombi temp sender oil dip stick&oq=kombi temp sender oil dip stick&aqs=chrome..69i57.16174j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
    Now to just put heat to the other end of the temp sender & see if it responds as you see?
    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2018
  20. syncro

    syncro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,034
    Location:
    Southern Highlands
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