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Pipes, tubes, hoses

Discussion in 'Fuel System & Electrics' started by Micky O, Jan 17, 2018.

  1. Micky O

    Micky O Member

    Messages:
    79
    Location:
    Blue Mountains
    Hiya team. I have some questions for your learned opinions. The Kombi engine seems to have quite a few pipes / tubes / hoses going every which way in the engine bay, some of which are very mysterious. I have two Kombis, both 2L, so I have opportunity to compare them. I discovered some weird things recently.

    Kombi 1
    That large rubber hose connecting that box thing on the crank case (scuse the techincal jargon!) to the air filter case - see Photo Exhibit No. 1. My Haynes calls it the 'crank case ventillation hose'. It was barely hanging on at one end, and totally unattached and flapping about at the other. And there's not a hose clamp in sight. Is this actually important? My guess is that some lazy bugger just left it off because it's a hassle to remove it every time you want to take the air filter cover off. But is it doing anything important, maybe preventing damage in the long run?
    (While you're viewing this, please admire the beautifully reconditioned carbies! :))

    20180117_104314.jpg

    Kombi 2
    What is that thing hanging off the air filter case with 2 hose nipples? As shown in Photo Exhibit No. 2. I can't even work out what it does or is called. One of my Kombis has abolutely nothing attached to these nipples! (The other Kombi has 2 hoses going to various places.) It doesn't seem to affect engine performance in any way, as this Kombi is going magnificently. What do these hoses do and are they important? Why has no previous mechanic spotted this startling absence of hoses, or cared sufficiently to do anything about it?
    20180117_104358.jpg
    Thanks in advance for any and all advice. Cheers, Mick
     
  2. Andy.

    Andy. Active Member

    Messages:
    439
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Kombi 1, as noted it's the case breather, and yes needs to connect to air cleaner (as on kombi2). The case needs to "breath" so it does not build up pressure, the purpose of the hose is to ensure the case is breathing filtered air in the air box. Depending on your engines condition, there can often be oil mist coming out through this hose, so connecting it to he air cleaner lets that get sucked back through the engine and burnt (part of '70's style emissions control). It is not under pressure so if the hose fits firmly no need for a hose clamp. One thing to watch for, due to the size many people use a heater hose for the connection. This rubber is not designed for fuel/oil, so will go soft and eventually fail.

    Kombi 2, this is part of the cold start for the engine. Connections on Kombi 1 are hard to see, but appear correct. The two connections are part of a temperature controlled valve, when inlet air is cold (would need to check manual for exact temps) it lets the engine draw warm air from the engine, not cold air from outside.
    One connection goes to a vacuum actuated flap at the air box inlet (visible at the back of your kombi2 pic), the other side goes to a vacuum port on the carbie.
    So not entirely necessary to be operational, but ensure there are no open vacuum ports on your carbies!!

    As for why no one picked it up before, I guess it depends on the mechanic and what instructions they were give at the time. Also keep in mind these vans have been out of production for 40+ years, many mechanics would not be experienced with how they "should" be connected up.

    While your in there looking and reconditioning, have a GOOD look at all your fuel lines, and especially the barbs they connect to (they can come loose), and try to trace back the fuel tank vent lines and ensure they are all good.
    Richard
     
    David H likes this.
  3. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,890
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    As Richard said...
    Esp the heater hose substition swelling. Get an oil tolerant one.
    Clean the breather box as well.
    If engine is fumy check air filter regularly

    Can't stress the importance of checking/ replacing fuel lines and the spigots on carbs enough.

    Usualy default position on the air filter intake is open to engine bay.
    This is fine. Pay to fit a heater air duct type hose from it to bring in fresh air from above battery.
    Bit hard to source. 63mm.
     
  4. David H

    David H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,452
    Location:
    newcastle
    Times 2
    Cheers
     
  5. Micky O

    Micky O Member

    Messages:
    79
    Location:
    Blue Mountains
    Thank you everyone. Some good advice there, as usual.

    Rest assured I am checking the fuel lines ... constant vigilance !!!
     
  6. Mordred

    Mordred Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,690
    Location:
    Penna, Hobart
    Just to help with Andy's answer, he is correct one goes to the warm air vflap. That is the right one. The left actually does not go to the carb but on to a vacuum port under the filter box on the cross pipe between the carbs. This is often blocked off with a short piece of pipe and a screw in the end, but is actually very useful for setting the solex carbs up. I lets you know by taking it off from that left port and putting your finger off and on whether the engine is running rich or lean at idle. Also a good point if you have a vacuum gauge to run the pipe to the gauge from.

    Adrian
     
  7. KahunaKombi

    KahunaKombi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,639
    Location:
    Bracken Ridge, Qld
    When cleaning the breather box put a new cork seal in also ;)
     
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  8. KahunaKombi

    KahunaKombi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,639
    Location:
    Bracken Ridge, Qld
  9. Mordred

    Mordred Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,690
    Location:
    Penna, Hobart
    Damn, get some cork from an art place or reject shop and make your own. Even if it isn't rubberised they will take a while to leak, and for the price you can make a lot out of one sheet.

    Adrian
     
  10. nils

    nils Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    Location:
    newcastle
    If you're getting rubberised anything for your engine, make sure it is nitrile not butyl otherwise you will be disappointed
     
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