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Putty Problems

Discussion in ''How To' & 'Handy Hints'' started by OberonViking, Sep 29, 2008.

  1. OberonViking

    OberonViking Active Member

    Messages:
    1,809
    Location:
    Bathurst, NSW
    I've been skimming a few spots with putty, and now 20 hours later it is still soft. Clearly I haven't used enough hardener. So I will be cleaning that out as best I can today.

    The product says 50 to 1, I've heard people say 10 to 1. I followed the directions at 50:1, and the putty was still more or less cream coloured with a very slight shade of pink.

    What colour am I aiming for? I imagine that with 10:1 I will end up with a distinctly pink putty. Any advice?
     
  2. marcus

    marcus Member

    Messages:
    172
    Location:
    Moorebank, Sydney
    Each brand will use their own formula so I would go off what the label says.

    I'm a Panel Beater and I can tell you that colour will also vary depending on brand.

    Climate will also change curing times as well. Cold weather requires more hardener and vice versa.
     
  3. OberonViking

    OberonViking Active Member

    Messages:
    1,809
    Location:
    Bathurst, NSW
    What happens if you use too much hardener? other than you run out sooner
     
  4. marcus

    marcus Member

    Messages:
    172
    Location:
    Moorebank, Sydney
    It will dry too quickly and you wont get enough time to apply it neatly therefore making it easy to sand.

    If the hardener is red in colour the putty once mixed is normally a light pink colour.

    I find you are better to use just that bit less hardener and if you have a heat gun you can speed up the drying process with that.

    If you have the time and enough filler trial it on an old panel or something similar until you get the mixture right.
     
  5. Bay_Buddha

    Bay_Buddha Member

    Messages:
    397
    Location:
    Berowra Heights,North of Sydney
    Too much hardener means it will go off quicker.

    The consequences of this might mean that you will not have applied enough to cover what you want before it goes off or you have too much and you need to spend more time sanding the excess off.

    In short it's not a huge mistake to make... It will help you work out how much you need to get it right. It can be a pain though!

    Have fun...

    Phill.
     
  6. Dingostrategy

    Dingostrategy Active Member

    Messages:
    4,322
    Location:
    SW Vic ++
    also, with more catalyst (hardener) you also create smaller polymer chains, meaning a weaker final mix. A slower cure creates longer and stronger bonds. I've also seen acrylic resin spontaneously combust with too much hardener in it.

    The upshot is if you must hurry the process, don't add too much extra hardner and as others say, the label is almost always a good guide.

    (used to teach workshop skills to uni students)
     

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