1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Red and White T3 Daily Driver

Discussion in 'Resto Corner' started by Mellow Yellow 74, Aug 17, 2014.

  1. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    I bought a red and white T3 a few months ago to be my daily driver.

    It is a 1985 1.9 litre automatic with 8 seats and has low kilometres and is clean and straight with original paint. I am unsure of the maintenance history, so I have been doing some work on it over the last few months before I start driving it daily.

    It isn't a resto, but I thought I would start a thread to include a few posts of what I have been up to under Resto Corner anyway.



    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
  2. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Cooling System Work 1

    The cooling system had lime green coolant in it which is not right so the first thing I planned was to do a coolant flush. There was also a slight smell of coolant occasionally so I decided to change the water pump o-rings at the same time in the hope that this was all it was rather than an issue with the head gaskets or studs. I was unable to remove one of the water pump nuts while the main pulley was in place so after a failed attempt to remove the main pulley, I decided to cut off the water pump nut and replace the pump.

    While the water pump was off I also removed and painted the cooling pipes on the engine.
    I replaced the thermostat and originally bought an 80[SUP]o[/SUP] thermostat on the assumption that this would help theh eater come on quicker, because it took ages to heat up. However, I later found that the heater circuit is independent to the thermostat and the heater problem was probably due to the existing thermostat being stuck open. I was still going to use the 80[SUP]o[/SUP] thermostat but then decided to keep it at the correct setting and bought an 87[SUP]o [/SUP]one and used that.

    Here is the new water pump on the original thermostat housing before it went back on:


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
  3. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Cooling System Work 2

    The small hose from the bleeder valve was very deteriorated so I replaced the hose, but unfortunately I snapped off the hose connection on the plastic bleeder valve off when I was trying to get the original hose clamp off (I hate those things).

    The original plastic bleeder valve suitable for an automatic (to supply cooling water to and from the transmission cooler) is no longer available. An aluminium replacement is available but is quite expensive so I decided to replace this with a plastic one suitable for a manual (more on this later). While the system was empty, I replaced the rear heater tees with new metal ones and also replaced all of the the worm drive clamps on the cooling hoses that had been installed in the past. I bought a pair of special hose clamp pliers off eBay (twice because the first pair broke the first time I tried to use them, but I got a refund and bought some others) and used the original constant tension style clamps hoses plus a couple of new Norma worm drive constant tension hoses where I couldn’t find the original type in the correct size.

    With everything reassembled, I refilled thesystem with G11 coolant and demineralised water and bled the system. Filling the system with the engine running is a slightly nerve wracking process but all went well.
    The heater now warms up quickly, there is no longer any coolant smell so it looks like the head gaskets and studs are ok and I am no using the correct coolant so am comfortable that the system will not corrode.

    This is the original bleeder valve with the broken hose connection and the hoses down to the automatic transmission, then the new one. It looks like the knob on the valve of the old one was missing before I broke the hose connection off.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2014
  4. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,617
    Location:
    Gosford
    Hey nice van. You are doing all the right things and sorting the cooling system is very important to reliability. Check all rubber hoses and replace as necessary and always use the factory type spring clamps except if you replace with silicone hoses as they seem to be better with a screw type that often comes with the hose. Put on your list a replacement cooling hose junction in stainless steel and also an aluminum thermostat housing is a good idea. Replacement of the fuel lines and replacement of the seals for lines and breather on the fuel tank is wise. If you can smell that sort of sweet smell of coolant when the engine is hot then you have a leak somewhere. Can find by visual inspection however sometimes requires a pressure test to locate it. Look for signs of dried coolant or drips on the ground upon engine cooling down. Great vans, enjoy :)
     
  5. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,617
    Location:
    Gosford
  6. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Transmission Work

    I removed the transmission pan and diff pan then cleaned and painted them. The inside of the diff was quite sludgy so Icleaned this up and replaced the pan with a new gasket and new diff oil. Thetransmission was clean inside so I replaced the filter and replaced the pan witha new gasket.

    Since I had replaced the coolant bleedervalve with one suitable for a manual, I no longer had coolant supply to thet ransmission. I looked into the various alternative transmission coolersa vailable and went with the Foreign Auto Supply transmission heat sink from Van Café. This is an oil to air cooler that does not require any separate cooling system and bolts on in place of the original transmission cooler - the transmission fluid flows through it and it has fins which give natural cooling.

    In order to install the new cooler I had to lower the front of the transmission and to do so I removed the CV joints, so while they were off I cleaned and regreased the CV joints. Refilling the transmission is interesting because in order to fill it to the correct level onthe dipstick you need to have the engine on and the transmission warm after driving it. I followed the method in Bentley but it is a little nerve wracking driving it to warm it up before you are confident that it is at the correct level to drive.

    Here are some photos showing the new cooler, the new cooler next to the original and the original and new coolers in position:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
  7. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Fuel System Work

    The fuel lines were all original and the fuel filler neck was perished so I decided to replace all lines and seals. I removed the fuel tank and painted it then replaced the various grommets and hoses to the fuel expansion tanks and on the filler and breather hoses plus a new level sender. I replaced all the hoses to from the fuel tank to the engine (and back) with new hoses and also relaced the plastic fitting on the fire wall with a metal one. While the hoses were off, I removed the injectors and had the ultrasonically cleaned and fitted new o-rings.

    I used the Just Kampers filler neck and ABA hose clamps from e-Bay,but all the other parts were from Van Café. The Van Café fuel lines are 5/16”internal diameter rather than 7mm but they were a snug fit on all the original lines and fittings. The outside diameter of this hose is too large to put inside the original fuel line hose covers, so I did not reuse these - apparently you can get weird reactions between new hoses and these covers anyway so I probably wouldn'thave used them anyway. I used cable ties tohold the fuel lines against the inlet manifold to prevent it rubbing onanything or touching anything too hot.


    I replaced the metal fuel filter after the fuel pump and removed the square plastic one before the pump. My fuel tank has a 7mm outlet but the pump has a 12mm inlet so I bought a 7 - 12mm adapter from Van cafe to replace the plastic filter. I was concerned that there could be some loose crap in the tank which may have been disturbed during the fuel tank work, so I temporarily installed a normal plastic inline fuel filter before the pump as I use on my T2 kombi and KG. However, I removed this almost straight awaybecause the fuel pump made a buzzing noise – this is cavitation due the fuel pump having insufficient suction pressure with the filter in place because the fuel tank sits so low on the T3.

    Here is the fuel tank when removed and before reinstalling after painting:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
    KahunaKombi likes this.
  8. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Brake Work 1

    The brakes had a bit of a squeal, but I checked the pads and shoes and these looked ok. The flexible brake lines were not in great condition so I decided to replace these with new ones. However, when I tried to bleed to brakes after installing them, I could not bleed the rear cylinder on the passenger side or the front caliper on the passenger side. I thought this could be a master cylinder problem, but this didn’t seem to be the case because the circuits are split front/rear rather than left/right.

    So I decided to replace the rear wheel cylinders and overhaul the front callipers. I bought new cylinders, caliper kits, shoes, pads and fitting kits from Just Kampers but ended up returning the cylinders and calliper kits. The cylinders were both Febi brand and were both the same JK part number, but they were a different Febi part number and were slightly different. You are supposed to replace brake components on both sides with identical equipment and I was not comfortable that they were slightly different.

    I did a web search to check on this and found that the Febi cylinders do not have the internal return springs like the original ones so the two cylinders do not move together. I checked out Van Café and they sell the ATE cylinders that do have the return springs so I decided to use these ones. I also noticed that the caliper kits Van Café sell are different for Girling and ATE callipers, whereas the JK ones are the same so I decided to buy the VanCafé kits for my ATE (Teves) callipers.

    Here are some photos of the two brake cylinders - almost the same, but not quite:


    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
  9. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,748
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Great Thread! And excellent looking bus.

    All the work you are doing, should make it a very reliable bus. :)
     
  10. Gerry and Robyn

    Gerry and Robyn Active Member

    Messages:
    577
    Location:
    Lilydale Vic. Australia
    Hi, great looking van. I love the colour combination.
    It looks like the duco has been well maintained....original hubcaps and bumper bars as well.
    The thread is very useful and well laid out. Well done.
    May you have many happy kilometers for a long time.
     
  11. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Brake Work 2

    Thanks for the feedback Phil, Grant and Gerry & Robin.

    The parts from Van cafe arrived so I have finished the rear brakes - the ATE cylinders match the ones that came off and are the same which is good.

    [​IMG]

    I pulled apart one of the old cylinders and it was leaking past the piston and full of dirty sludge, so obviously the brake fluid hasn't been flushed for many moons - no wonder I had trouble bleeding one side (I am amazed I was able to bleed the other side!).

    [​IMG]

    The shoes had a reasonable amount of wear left but I decided to replace them as well as the springs and hardware. I bought some brake pliers and a spring removal tool to make things easier and they were good once I watched some clips on youtube to work out how to use them! I tried to use the procedure in Bentley but it was so brief and vague I had to search the web and make up my own procedure based on a few different sites.

    I took photos of the shoes and springs as I found them and then installed the new ones on the first side the same way, then did a final check against the pictures in Bentley. Unfortunately whoever did this last time installed the shoe tensioning sprtings upside down so they were fouling on the adjuster and the vertical spring was connected to the shoe rather than the adjuster.

    [​IMG]

    So I had to pull it all apart and reinstall eveyerthing correctly, but at least now I know it is correct. I still need to bleed and adjust them but I've done enough for today.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2014
  12. 85 Caravelle

    85 Caravelle Member

    Messages:
    131
    Location:
    Rozelle,Sydney
    Very nice van same vintage as mine ,also my daily driver ,,love it !!
     
  13. KahunaKombi

    KahunaKombi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,763
    Location:
    Bracken Ridge, Qld
    Nice Van and a great read on what you've done and corrected :D - amazing what you do find even from VW work shops :(
     
  14. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Other Bits and Pieces

    I have adjusted and bled the rear brakes and they are working well. I still can't bleed the front passenger side calliper but they are working fine so I have decided to leave the calliper overhaul and do this later when the pads need changing.

    I have done some other general maintenance such as replacing the oil, oil filter and air filter plus changing some other deteriorated hoses in the engine bay such as the oil breather, air bypass and brake vacuum hoses. I naively tried to buy these locally but they are all special size hoses so I had to buy them from Van Café. The engine bay is looking fairly tidy now.

    [​IMG]

    The stereo consisted or a tape deck and two 4” speakers in the doors so I replaced this with a new radio/MP3 player, two new 4” speakers in the doors and two 6 x 9 speakers in the kick plate under the rear sear. The new stereo is a “mech-less” type (i.e. no CD player) so is less deep than standard so fits easily in the T3 dash.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I also bought a used Hayman Reece towbar (thanks Grantus!), painted this and installed it along with a new rear bumper from JK because the old one was dented and rusty. I also bought some new bumper end caps from JK to replace the original ones because they were faded and the pins and tabs were broken. But these would not fit on the bumper with the pins and tabs in place so I had to cut some of these off, so in retrospect I wouldn’t have bothered.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,748
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Wow! That towbar scrubbed up well!

    Now I feel bad for letting it leave in the state it was in, (solid, functional, & in need of makeover), but it would have been priced higher if I sorted it prior....:rolleyes:

    Again, great bus, and excellent thread. Good stuff! :)
     
  16. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,617
    Location:
    Gosford
    Nice van and getting better by the day. If you are going to keep this van for a long time I would suggest that you get this alternator fix kit. It beefs up the alternator mounting points which on the 1.9's are prone to cracking off the block. Later 2.1 had a slightly different mounting to solve this problem but still good to fit on them as well. I have seen several 1.9's where the mount has broken.
    http://www.gowesty.com/ec_view_details.php?id=4454&category_id=&category_parent_id=
     
  17. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Alternator Bracket

    I have installed the GoWesty alternator bracket. It bolts onto the engine block in the holes where the power steering pump would go and provides additional support to the lower alternator bolt with the original bracket still in place. It was easy to install - just had to remove the alternator, bolt the bracket on, replace the alternator with a new longer coach bolt (a bit awkward getting the bolt through from behind with alternator in place) and then bolt it up and tighten the belt. Thanks for the tip Phil!

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  18. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Idle Switch Adjustment

    The idle was a little fast and not consistent so I checked the idle switch operation. It is a 1.9 litre engine with the Digijet EFI but it has the Digifant style idle switch (single switch underneath the throttle body rather than two at the side). When I exercised the throttle the switch was clicking at full throttle but not at idle so I adjusted it. This involed using a 3mm hex socket to loosen the mounting screw (the left hand screw) and to turn the adjusting screw (the right hand screw).

    The mounting screw unscrewed ok but the adjusting one must be made of aluminium or something because the hex head stripped with very little pressure, but I was able to use a torx socket to adjust it. I adjusted the switch ok so it clicked coming off idle but when I tightened the mounting screw it changed the adjustment so the switch didn't work from idle. After mucking around a few times I was able to tighten the mounting screw using the hex socket while holding the adjusting screw with the torx socket.

    When I restarted the idle was idle was consistent and lower speed but it is still a little high. This could be due to the throttle body being dirty and not closing fully so I will remove and clean the throttle body sometime then re-check the switch before paying with the idle screw on the throttle body. I also checked the throttle mechanism for sloppiness when I was testing the switch and it seemed ok so hopefully it is just a cleanliness issue.
     
  19. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Electrical Bits and Pieces

    The insulation on the alternator wiring was looking dodgy so I bought a new alternator wiring harness and also installed a hot start relay while I was at it. I bought these from Jay Brown who advertises on the samba as thatvwbusguy and these are really good quality items.

    The new alternator harness uses a thick wire and has a more direct route (i.e. from the alternator straight to the starter with separate wires to the wriring junction box, rather than the original which goes from the alternator to the starter via the wiring junction box) so this should provide lower resistance which will help the charging system).

    [​IMG]

    The hot start relay kit comes with wiring so you can mount the relay on the fire wall in the engine bay to keep it out of the weather.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I also bought a GoWesty third brake light kit and mounted in behind the jailbars at the bottom of the window. I ran the wires around the window under the window rubber then through the hole near the hinge and down to the passenger tail light via the passenger side vent. The instructions say you need to remove the head lining to run the wire but I drilled a hole inside the vent and managed to pull the wire through using a bend coat hanger wire. I wired in a connection plug with jumper wires to the original taillight plug so I can remove it if necessary.


    [​IMG]

    I have wired up the trailer plug on the towbar and run the wires to the wiring junction box with a connection plug with jumper wires to connect to the original plug but haven't fiished this yet because I need to find some new round wiring pin connections like the original ones.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2014
  20. Mellow Yellow 74

    Mellow Yellow 74 Active Member

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Sydney
    Headlight Relays

    I also bought headlight relays from Jay Brown and installed them today. They were easy to install, just involved unplugging and plugging in wires at the fuse box. The instructions said to mount the relays under the fuse box mounting screws but I thought this looked a bit dodgy so I installed them in the spare relay places above the fuse box. I recently installed H4 bulbs and was a little disappointed that they didn't make much difference so hopefully the relays will make and improvement when I go for a cruise tonight.


    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     

Share This Page