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spot lights

Discussion in 'Fuel System & Electrics' started by chris taylor, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Repositioned my spot lights which were wired into the cig lighter and interior light side of things, also they were wired up to work only on high beam, when turning them on they blew the fuse so replaced the 8 amp with a 16 amp {could find any 10 12 or 14 amp } and ran the the motor with them turned on for 10 mins and all is good so far , interested to find out if there is a 12 or 14 amp ceramic fuses available as 16 amp seems to be an overkill in this situation .
     
  2. Barry

    Barry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Location:
    Abbotsford NSW
    Had a quick look on ebay and couldn't find anything

    You can get an inline glass fuse and put that in
     
  3. Alpal

    Alpal Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,309
    Location:
    Melbourne Bend of Islands
    Replacing fuses with a BIGGER fuse may not be the best option. Circuits have a designated fuse rating for a reason. Perhaps high draw items should be wired with a relay and in line fuse? Sparky knowledgeable please advise.
     
    syncro likes this.
  4. rstucke

    rstucke Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    Wamberal NSW AUS
    lets say a 100w light at 12v = 8.something amps x 2 =16.something amps (no calculator handy ie I'm lazy)
    when selecting a fuse it should be 10 percent higher
    adjust the above for the wattage of your lights.
    and know that the charging system is above 12v so current flow will be slightly less while running.
    watts=amps x volts
    if you have 100w lights, shows your fuse is only just (most 100w watt lights aren't so the current is less)
    by the way these sort of currents really need a relay with a separate power source or your ignition barrel is going to die
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2018
    oldman likes this.
  5. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust

    Barry , thanks ,thought about that, BUT the fuse fittings are the spade type fittings and the glass type fuses are to long to go in:(
     
  6. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Alpal , restucke, thought about the higher fuse rating and was a bit concerned , looked up fuse box on the internet for said 76 model VW kombi and found that {according to them } fuse holder # 7 is a dormant or free circuit , so maybe i could tap into it.
    Thanks Chris T
     
  7. Barry

    Barry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Location:
    Abbotsford NSW
    What i mean is you can buy the in line single plastic holders that you join into the wire

    Leave the 16 amp in there and add this additional

    Like the sort you see going to your radio
     
    chris taylor likes this.
  8. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Ahh , now i know what you mean, i have a couple of those ,so what your saying is use a lesser or lower number fuse, such as 10 or 12 amp between the spots and the 16 amp fuse. that could work.
     
    Barry likes this.
  9. Barry

    Barry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Location:
    Abbotsford NSW
    Yep, that's what I mean
     
    David H likes this.
  10. KahunaKombi

    KahunaKombi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,518
    Location:
    Bracken Ridge, Qld
    Chris, no doubt your driving lights are hooked up to the high beam and through an isolation switch thus operating only when the high beam is on and when the isolation switch is also on ........ had it set up that way on the Type 3 - from what I could work out with the wiring it all just seemed to go through the high beam with no other fuses required :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  11. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Yes Bert , thats how it is, i like this way as i can have high beam on without the spots coming on.
     
  12. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Cbus , is it normal for the headlight switch wires at the back of the switch to get hot. noticed it yesterday when trying to see where all the wires were going,
    as far as i can determine the spots are getting their power from the interior light fuse as when the fuse blows the spot and interior lights go of but the headlights stay on. chris
     
  13. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,848
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Hi Chris.
    Had this written but not completed.
    Will quote n answer your last post separately........

    Not sure on your spare fuse but the purpose of fuses is to protect the wiring.
    Power draw depends upon load. In this case the spotlights.
    If you put a large load on thin wiring it burns out the wiring due to increased heat from high resistance that increases with load.

    To protect against this the wiring must be sized correctly plus a fuse is in line to limit the current.

    If you increase the fuse rating to run a bigger load you are liable to create a fire.

    My suggestion is run a new wire from battery, or positive junction at starter solenoid.
    I would fuse it as near as practical to where you tap into power.

    Run a relay at front with power supply from this wire and switching power for relay from a high beam wire.

    This will protect your ign switch and existing wiring.
    It will also ensure good voltage to your spotlights.
    Assuming a halogen bulb rated at 13.8v ( usualy higher v for rating) is 100% , then you have a 20% drop in output @ 12v and 30%@ 11.5v.
    The more load you put on a small wire the greater the voltage drop.
    This applies to a kombi as it doesn't have very heavy wiring.
    Check you voltage at headlights with them on and with engine running.
    Ensure good terminal connections.

    Light bars are claimed to be good ;)
    Low power drain for output.

    Haven't used one yet myself.
     
  14. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,848
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    The switches and wiring do get a bit warm when headlights are on.
    Very warm may be a warning.
    Sorry. Can't give temps.
    Heat is a product of current and resistance so any heat is an indicator of power loss thru a high resistance join or too much current thru a wire not designed to take that load.

    In your situation ,
    Ensure plugs are pressed in well...
    Ensure the headlights are no greater than 60/55...
    Fridge is a direct heavy wire from house battery..
    Run a new wire from starter battery as previously mentioned via relay for spotlights..

    I expect you may have a relay already running the spotlights.
    And the power to the relay is from a wire after the fuse in interior light circuit.

    Follow spotlight wires back to find relay.
    And from that to the connection on interior light wire.
    Another wire from relay will be relay earth and screwed to body most likely.
    Another wire from a headlight wire is the switching current.
    Two leads out, one to each spotlight.
     
  15. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Thanks Col , Went for a cruise {8 klms } with the h/lights on and the spots turned off, and wiring got hot ,so will take out the switch and see if there is a bad contact there {probably never been out in all the years since manufacture ,} and will clean all terminals, maybe need a new one perhaps. while im at it will check to see where the wiring hook up for the spots is ,even though it is connected to the high beam it could be drawing its power from another terminal i suspect ,as when the fuse went the main headlights were still on. Just a guess on my part...
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  16. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,848
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Check what bulbs you have in the headlights.

    Any wire from headlight to relay only carries a small current to switch the relay. No issue.
    The main power for spotlights must be off the interior light circuit and it is likely not designed to carry that load so overloaded as indicated by the fuse blowing.
     
  17. Maxa1967

    Maxa1967 Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Western Queensland
    The wiring for your spotlights should have very little to do with the original vehicle wiring except as Cbus says the trigger wire from the headlight which is only low voltage. If your spotlight circuit wireing is getting hot it more than likely means your wiring is too light. Try running a fused 6mm wire from the battery to the relay and a decent earth.
    Most light bars I’ve seen are very over rated, put out a lot of light but of the wrong colour so you end up seeing less than a good set of halogens, just that halogens suck more power.
     
  18. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Ok, It is not the spot light wiring thats getting hot, its the wiring at the back of the main light switch,with the spots turned off the wiring still gets hot. I am now leaning more and more towards the idea of a direct current from the battery to the spots using an inline fuse of course, the spots are themselves are earthed out to the bull bar,,,, so that should be sufficient i guess . will clean up the terminals today and see if that makes a difference , i do have a feeling that the globes in the headlights were changed to halogen some time ago and if thats the case i will take the easy option and put the original type globes back in.
     
  19. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,848
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Halogen are good for the headlights.
    You still need some decent low beam for when coming off high or spots.

    You just need to check that the wattage is no higher than 60/55.

    Some heat is normal on the plug.
    Mildly warm, maybe 20C?

    Maybe run a clean heavy connection from bar to body to be sure.
    May have paint in way of a good circuit from bar to body.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
  20. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Thanks Col, as i said will try to clean the terminals first and follow through from there .Simple things first ,then more serious things if i have to ,at least now i have an idea what im looking for .
     
    cbus likes this.

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