1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

T3 Ute Tray Slats.

Discussion in 'T3 & T4 Tech Help Clinic' started by KahunaKombi, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. KahunaKombi

    KahunaKombi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    22,225
    Location:
    Bracken Ridge, Qld
    Ah so Foghorn Leghorn was right with his "It's all a matter of mathematics" :rolleyes:
     
  2. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    18,657
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Is that because you were trying to fit a curved piece of timber to a flat and angled metal tray? :rolleyes:

    Completed a test piece today, but it just doesn't make sense to me, to have the slat curved on the underside, when the tray is flat with flat angled sides of the pressing.....o_O
     
  3. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,047
    Location:
    Gosford
    "Completed a test piece today, but it just doesn't make sense to me, to have the slat curved on the underside, when the tray is flat with flat angled sides of the pressing....."
    Could it be an attempt to restrict the amount of moisture that could get trapped under the slat? Anyway Grant I am sure you can improve on the design. :)
     
  4. syncro

    syncro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,294
    Location:
    Southern Highlands
    Isn't there a small area of flatness on the underside? Or is that just from wear?

    Is Grant's next project engine hatches?
     
  5. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,047
    Location:
    Gosford
    If so I have a one he can replicate :)
     
  6. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    18,657
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Next step was to mount the cutters in the spindle moulder, adjust projection, set up rear fence and set height.

    [​IMG]

    I then made a 2m long x 50mm thick laminated bed, and passed through the cutters....

    [​IMG]

    Then I added a backing fence to hold the rectangular slat stock, and passed it by the cutters twice, once each side.

    [​IMG]

    The end result came out a little thick at 18mm, so a simple adjustment of the rear fences, will remove more material, to leave it around 16mm finished thickness.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    18,657
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Moisture looks like it would always be a problem, considering they use the lower sections of the deck, and then drill holes through it to fix them down. Even though there's only 3 contact points, any dirt trapped under it would be holding extra moisture, and difficult to clean out - perhaps they only had a short expected life, to be replaced if exposed constantly to the weather, and used for carting loose materials?

    Possibly a small line of modern day adhesive, like Sikaflex Panel Bond to hold them down, could be an option, rather than drilling through the deck?
    There is a small flat base, to help sit them level, but that assumes a perfect as new deck, and increases the moisture trap.......

    I'll keep playing with some test pieces...:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2015
  8. KahunaKombi

    KahunaKombi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    22,225
    Location:
    Bracken Ridge, Qld
    No Grant it was because the tray was not even (dents) from where things had been dropped and most were where the pop rivets went but as the metal is so thin got the areas to pop back up close to level - had to improvise with tools to do it with but a scissor jack from the Mazda and hunk of 8x2 sleeper and an old axe handle worked a treat.

    I would say it is an easier job for 2 to do as you can get someone to hold the slat in place while you pop rivet - the sealed ones I used were mongrels to pop but if you have a heavy duty rivet gun it should be easier.
     
  9. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    18,657
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    I imagine fitting them to a brand new flat deck at the factory, would have been "a piece of cake"! ;)
     
  10. KahunaKombi

    KahunaKombi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    22,225
    Location:
    Bracken Ridge, Qld
    The flat section on the bottom is about 8mm - the ones I fitted were flatter/squarer on the top & bottom and covered on the sides - see pics on page 1

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2015
  11. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    18,657
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    I have replicated the 8mm flat base. Just that it's a very small section to hold it in a level position, (and not easy to photograph the contact points), but perhaps that's because the SC test deck, has seen better days.... :(

    Think I'll reduce the overall thickness, and just run with it......:rolleyes:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,047
    Location:
    Gosford
    I like your work Grant & I think you are on the right track. That timber looks nice too.
     
  13. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    18,657
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Cheers Phil,

    The colour varies from piece to piece, depending upon the density before the cooking, and length of cooking time. I'll go through the pack available during the week, and try and find the nicest boards for the job. ;)
     
  14. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    18,657
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    Went shopping today........scored some nice boards that should be very close to the colour of the test piece in the pic. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2015
  15. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Have seen the issues with rust with the holes in the tray,
    any thoughts on improving the original fixing procedure?
    lots of rust in treasure chests which is likely from this and seam failures ?
    also . only epoxy paints are fully waterproof for prolonged immersion in water.
    Do you think it would be an advantage to not secure with rivets or screws and also have a waterproof bedding material?
    Have never had slats so just postulating.
     
  16. Grantus

    Grantus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    18,657
    Location:
    Southern ACT
    I still don't get it Col, for all the reasons you've posted. My SC is not heading this way, because I'm not convinced.

    I've had two Industrial Designers visit, that I have full respect for, and they are also of the same opinion.

    It is only good for a "show pony", to look better than it did leaving the factory. For any workhorse, it's going to be more of hinderance, than a help.

    I have only sourced a timber product, that will stand up much better than standard timber, to resist warping and wear in the weather.

    I did suggest an alternative to drilling through the deck in this post:

     
  17. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    might be on a diferent tangent but the thoughts are;
    holes are where water gets in and rust occurs in treasure chest and around holes
    sorted by using sika as you mention.

    water and dust sitting under the timbers can penetrate most paints eventualy.
    Im probably being overkill [worked on boatbuilding as well so excuse the paranoia] as would bet that you wouldn't have it in a situation where water can sit without drying out fairly rapidly[within couple days]

    Lacquer and 2pac poly are only guaranteed for full immersion for up to 3 days.

    Hence I do go for overkill and wondered if bedding on something like a lanolin grease would limit water being able to sit between board and floor [humouring my anal concerns]

    Fully bedding on sika [to the extent that one was to ensure water sealing] would make removal damn near impossible.

    just musings
     
  18. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,047
    Location:
    Gosford
    Plan is to use some type of sealer such as sika on the pop rivets at time of installation as well as a liberal coating of waxsol underneath the slats, slats will be treated all round with tung oil and all will reside under a nice new tonneau cover. Not a show pony but a daily driver with the odd trip to tip and hardware store with some protection from the load laid down prior to loading.
     
  19. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    wasn't thinking of tonneau cover so ,yeah, big difference.
    recon that system would work.
    a variation could be a dob of epoxy resin on the countersunk rivets for a cleaner look.
    maybe a small circle of sika around each hole in the tray as well .?
     
  20. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,047
    Location:
    Gosford
    Will give your suggestion of sika and epoxy a go as will add some protection.
     

Share This Page