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What did you do to your Kombi today?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by BrianK, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,393
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Hey Dreadhead.
    Will try to PM you this arvo and tell you how i did mine when i discovered rust ,simple ,easy, permanent solution. Not generally looked upon favorably .
     
  2. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,394
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    No epoxy:oops:

    Any pitted metal needs to be removed in entirety and fresh metal replacement.
    Also remove the outer skin where it folds over as there will be rust under there.
    It is a critical area and you need full thickness metal in all parts.
    Anything showing rust pits is not full thickness and will be a weak point in an accident.
    Stagger joins.
     
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  3. Dredhead

    Dredhead Active Member

    Messages:
    174
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    . Ok cheers Chris
     
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  4. Dredhead

    Dredhead Active Member

    Messages:
    174
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    Yep I know I missed some pitted sections. Will be more thorough next time
     
    chris taylor likes this.
  5. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,394
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Was stirring Chris ;)
    I found having a selection of angles pre folded by a sheet metal shop useful.
    And a shrinker/ stretcher, but the stretching can be done by hammer .
    Just a bit easier with the flash toys :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
    chris taylor likes this.
  6. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,394
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    If you are running gasless , I found trade tools house brand wire better.
    And don't be tempted to go too fine on the wire.
    0.8 is smallest needed. Even 0.9 is ok.
    feed is slower so not such an issue when it doesnt arc.
    Also means you can keep the current up for good penetration.
    That's where cutting back to solid metal and doing bigger sections also helps.
    Not so difficult to get a good strike on cleaner / thicker metal.
    Cheers.
     
  7. Dredhead

    Dredhead Active Member

    Messages:
    174
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    2C764AF8-D02A-4191-8CAD-864439D686AD.jpeg
    Don’t worry I’ve thought about making it but tht with the 3 layers involved we’d be a tad easier not ruling it out tho
    Waz
     
  8. Barry

    Barry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,366
    Location:
    Abbotsford NSW
    Dredhead likes this.
  9. Vwbus guy

    Vwbus guy Active Member

    Messages:
    116
    Location:
    Queensland Australia
    You need all new metal there.
    Don't use bog it's not structual,
    Very dangerous having bog,it gives a false sense of security when actually the vehicle is compromised structurally.
    Your on the gc
     
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  10. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,393
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    You stirring me again Col.lol
    I do things my way, but i still want Cols input. Its always good to get the experts advice ,it does come in handy. My vans name is Patches , but was not me that gave it that name. Wonder why they called it that.!!!!!!!.
    Col just so you know i like to leave the rusty panel there ,depending how bad it is of course.
    1, i kill the rust off first ,then take the damaged panel back to metal ,then slightly sink the damage part in a bit with a bit of wood and a small hammer .I then make up the new panel, (i use galv fencing iron) then sand back the galv on one side and apply the bog.and place the new panel over the old .apply firm preasure to it until its sets .It does have a very strong bond but to be on the safe sidei the use as many pop rivets as required to do the job.and hold tight..Now i know im going to get a lot of criticism here BUT to each their own .it works well for me and i have never had a repair job fail yet.Even when i had that altercation the panel held tight..so Dreadhead now i dont have to PM you.
     
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  11. Dredhead

    Dredhead Active Member

    Messages:
    174
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    Yep on the goldy.
    Definitely no bog going in there only for final surface shape, that’s why I tht a cut corner panel off a donor bus welded in.
     
  12. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,394
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Being an old hand at body finishing you should know better than that Chris. ;)

    Everyone to their own but it's best not to give the inexperienced too much licence to try dodgy fixes .
    Some may in fact work well but, if learning, then the learners do some horrendous things that just don't work and they think they are geniuses..
    (Not having a good at you either "dreds" but a lot of people will look at threads later who are starting from zilch and no care )
    Best to educate in how to do things safely before the bog and blackjack cover over rust with no prep then flip their masterpiece.
    Not applying that to anyone here but it is a very common practice hence my position on this.

    Frame and pillars should be welded.
    Glueing is fine on panels but the proper prep must be followed and should use the appropriate body epoxies.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
    chris taylor likes this.
  13. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,393
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
     
  14. T1 Terry

    T1 Terry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,400
    Location:
    Mannum South Australia
    I went to a demo night for that panel gluing stuff that is 2 part and has a special mixer tube ..... can't remember the name of the stuff now, but it wasn't cheap. He glued a folded panel edge onto a flat sheet of metal and two hrs later put it in the vice and tried to pull the flat sheet off it. We all had a go at it including the TAFE teachers trying to prove there was no substitute for full seam welding. Actually torn the sheet metal at the edges of the glue line but the glue wouldn't let go.
    Haven't ever tried it myself because I've got the mig welder, but the whole idea of adhesives being a weaker option to full penetration welding was turned on its head that night .... that was back in the late 90's, they must have got even better now.

    T1 Terry
     
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  15. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,394
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Similar stuff but wider range.
    Stronger than spot welding.
    A rep was trying to talk us plus gmh n ford into using different adhesives in mid 80s.
    I love it for some areas where you can't get internal after assy and don't want the oxidation from welding.
    Good for big flat panels.

    Great if used properly but given the lazy prep by a lot of people it would be disaster in some hands.

    About $90 a tube but the cartridges hold about half what you would expect.
    Still, it speeds up process and needs less finishing.
    Have seen a skin I used a similar glue on after it was involved in a later crash.
    No give at all. And it only had lacquer finish over the repair.
     
  16. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,394
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Agree Chris.
    I do dodgy stuff on mine at times.
    I know all the dodgy tricks and how long they " last ". Started at age 15 ;)
    You know how long the rust has been in the " peril " :oops:

    Not bagging either of you.
    Just explaining the other side of the coin for those who follow.
    Or hopefuly some bits of info that may be helpful.
     
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  17. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,393
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    Mitsubishi used it when i worked there, albeit .only on bonnets , doors ,and boot lids inner panels to outer panels.
    Is all good. Col, i dont mind being criticised but as i said ,the dollars were not there all those years ago to do the the job any other way . I have to say though , what i did is still hanging together.i will say that if i have to do it again i will nick the sons mig welder and learn how to weld .
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
  18. T1 Terry

    T1 Terry Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,400
    Location:
    Mannum South Australia
    Thanks for the update. Often wondered how the stuff went out in the real world and not just in the ideal set up that can occur in a demo at the Tafe.
    After the dramas I had welding a half panel into the left hand rear section over the wheel in my kombi, I thought real hard about gluing the next one on if I ever had to, no heat distortion and panel buckling then .... The fact the surrounding panels were already stressed after a rather rough crash repair by a previous beater didn't help. There had been bits of wood glued in behind the panel to stop the panel "drumming" so as soon as I cut it things started to go pear-shaped, it only got worse from there

    T1 Terry
     
  19. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,394
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    First attempt by gmh wasn't a great success.
    Remember the glued in firewalls.?
    About late 80s?

    Has to be the right glue or weld and properly engineered joint.
     
  20. wombatventures

    wombatventures Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,054
    Location:
    Peterborough SA
    Used to drive that road with bus loads of passengers transferring to and from the houseboats at Mannum. New brakes on the bus every 3 months. Bloody luggage trailer full of grog would push you around every corner!

    Might see you around on the 9th of January. We're down your way for the music day. Keep an eye out for the Notch.
     
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