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1976 Bay Fuel pump and other issues

Discussion in 'Performance' started by Mirri.A-76, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. Mirri.A-76

    Mirri.A-76 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Bellarine Peninsula
    Hi everyone,
    Recently I got my Kombi named Wilma she's a 1976 Bay Camper conversion. After several visits to the mechanic (who ill not name) Im still not satisfied with how she's running, Yes i understand she's a old car but before getting the gear box rebuilt issues have continued to rise, which include faulty work which ended with the execrator getting stuck full throttle down hill on the great ocean road...

    So my question to you all is, have any of you fitted your vw's with an Electirc Fuel pump, and if so how much did it cost? (I have a feeling Iv been ripped off on every visit to my mechanic)

    Wilma was fitted with a Facet Electric Fuel pump (comparable with Gasoline, Diesel, Biodiesel, Blended Alcohol and fuel additives) It looks similar to this picture: https://static.doghouserepair.com/images/products/5759648159.jpg and lets say Im glad my dad was the one who generously paid :umm:

    Kindess Regards,
    Mirri
     
  2. vwfreak03

    vwfreak03 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,548
    Location:
    Hobart, Tasmania
    pm sent..........
     
  3. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,442
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Facet pumps can range from $40 to $130
    fitting would be about an hr

    they are notorious for running overpressure and should have a pressure regulator and idealy a shut off solenoid/valve.
     
  4. 1500king

    1500king Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,617
    Location:
    Adelaide, SA
    Pierburg roller cell pump...

    A favourite convenience Aussie site below..

    http://www.injectorsonline.com/indivprod.php?cid=76

    Look for FP551, 3-5PSI Pierburg "external lift pump" in the fuel pump section..

    Quiet as a mouse, no rattles and reliable.

    Make sure you install a tachometric relay and fuel lock(can get both from MGA-Mega Gas Australia...and use 3/16 barbed fittings)to run it for safety...Pierburg also supplies a relay/wiring kit.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2014
  5. fancy-bug

    fancy-bug Member

    Messages:
    118
    Location:
    Petrie, QLD
    Unless your running large carbs, an electric pump shouldn't be required! A standard solex only had the mechanical pump.

    My dual 40 drla's needed to be run with a regulator as has been said, the float valve pulsed without it wearing the valve very quickly causing it to leak when the engine was off.

    What other issues do you have?
     
  6. Mirri.A-76

    Mirri.A-76 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Bellarine Peninsula
    When we contacted the mechanic they said that they haven't been able to get mechanical pumps in for years, which is the only reason I was happy to go with the electric one. Since getting it installed the reeves have been ridiculously low resulting in numerous stalls in rather inconvenient situations and speed going up slight slops being 30-40 kmph in 100 zones which i could normally reach..

    Regularly First gear is difficult to get into and she get Stuck in Reverse, we've paid for a clutch adjustment and a heaps of work on the gear box , before getting the gear box done she popped out of first gear but everything else was fine (my parents just wanted me to be a little more 'safe')
     
  7. fancy-bug

    fancy-bug Member

    Messages:
    118
    Location:
    Petrie, QLD
    Try just kampers website, they are in oz, pretty sure they do mechanical pumps!

    I just gave one away for a 1600!! :-(

    I assume you are running a type1 engine

    Are you running a modified engine?
    If not,
    Are you happy to go back to standard, as standard they are pretty dependable when looked after and not thrashed.

    From what you have said, it sounds like the carb settings have been messed with, maybe the jets too, and the gear selector shaft bushing would be my first call on the gearbox, if it now doesn't jump out of gear, but is hard to change/ select gears.

    Do you have a lot of play on the gear lever ?

    Don't stress, most of these are fairly easy fixes
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2014
  8. Mordred

    Mordred Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,994
    Location:
    Penna, Hobart
    The real mechanical pumps havent been available for years as he said, (and the new ones available are chinese built and have been reported with numerous problems and failures) but you do need the right electrical pump with a low pressure feed and have it fitted with a tachometric relay. The relay has a wire from the coil which senses the pulses from the ignition and turns the pump off if they stop(ie the engine has stalled with the ignition on. What can, (and amazing often does) happen is a fuel pipe leaks, breaks, fitting falls out of the carb etc and the fuel sprays into the engine bay and catches fire from a spark or something hot. The engine may stall or run out of fuel in the cab bowl and the owner sees smoke coming from the rear. Jumps out and forgets to turn off the ignition and (without the relay) the pump continues to run and pump fuel on to the fire resulting in a much bigger and expensive mess than if he had fitted it properly.

    It sounds like you have a Type IV motor, as you can get the type 1 engine fuel pumps everywhere. The gear shift bush at the front and the gerarbox coupling just in front of the gear box wear and can give problems changing gears, and there when they are checked and ok there is a system for adjusting the gear shift by putting it into second, loosening the 2 bolts on the floor at the bottom of the shifter. Make sure the bottom of the 3 plates is over to the left as far as it will go and then move the shifter so the first 100mm before the bend is 90 degrees to the floor left and right and forward and backward. Tightern the bolts and try it. Confirm this in a manual as I am going from memory.

    Adrian
     
  9. 1500king

    1500king Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,617
    Location:
    Adelaide, SA
    You need to get with the times Sir Chap!!

    Unless you have cornered the market of NOS Pierburg Type IV Mechanical pumps and rebuild kits:)p), you don't stand a chance of reliability or avoiding siphoning issues with the repro rubbish that is on the market these days(they don't have an anti-siphon valve in them like the originals, therefore, be prepared for fuel dilution and catastrophes ).

    There is nothing wrong with a high quality electric pump, an electric fuel lock and tachometric relay fused and wired in correctly.

    In regard to the drla's, performance carbs, etc... Do you really think that because you have physically larger carbs on your motor that you are going to need an electric pump? I ran 40IDF's on a high comp 2.0 with a decent cam and 42x36 heads and still achieved 400km to the tank. Do you think that if your motor suddenly uses an extra 5L of fuel(akin to a higher performance motor) over 4 hours of running that a standard pump cannot keep up? The standard pumps are very good....but they are only good when they are not failing internally and the motor does not have a worn out pushrod or camshaft lobe.

    The differential in fuel consumption between performance carbs and standard carbs is negligible where mechanical/ electric pumps aren't an issue on either.

    Even standard carbs need a fuel pump. If they can't get a good mechanical one, then electric it is.

    The Pierburg electric pump is internally regulated in the same way the mechanical pump is..
     
  10. 1500king

    1500king Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,617
    Location:
    Adelaide, SA
    You need to get with the times Sir Chap!!

    Unless you have cornered the market of NOS Pierburg Type IV Mechanical pumps and rebuild kits:)p), you don't stand a chance of reliability or avoiding siphoning issues with the repro rubbish that is on the market these days(they don't have an anti-siphon valve in them like the originals, therefore, be prepared for fuel dilution and catastrophes ).

    There is nothing wrong with a high quality electric pump, an electric fuel lock and tachometric relay fused and wired in correctly.

    In regard to the drla's, performance carbs, etc... Do you really think that because you have physically larger carbs on your motor that you are going to need an electric pump? I ran 40IDF's on a high comp 2.0 with a decent cam and 42x36 heads and still achieved 400km to the tank. Do you think that if your motor suddenly uses an extra 5L of fuel(akin to a higher performance motor) over 4 hours of running that a standard pump cannot keep up? The standard pumps are very good....but they are only good when they are not failing internally and the motor does not have a worn out pushrod or camshaft lobe.

    The differential in fuel consumption between performance carbs and standard carbs is negligible where mechanical/ electric pumps aren't an issue on either.

    Even standard carbs need a fuel pump. If they can't get a good mechanical one, then electric it is.

    The Pierburg electric pump is internally regulated in the same way the mechanical pump is..

    You will also have fuel siphoning issues with that Type 1 DRLA'd motor if you do not have a lock off valve. Remember, the fuel tank is higher than the carbs, needle/seats WILL leak(New, "pulsed", old or whatever...they WILL leak).
     
  11. syncro

    syncro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,219
    Location:
    Southern Highlands
    Type 1 engines finished here in 1975. All Kombis from 1976 to 1982 had 2 litre engines.
     

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