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Fuel tank vents in a single cab

Discussion in 'Bay Tech Clinic' started by kr.au, Jul 15, 2020.

  1. kr.au

    kr.au New Member

    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Looking for advice. I am restoring a 75 late bay single cab. The fuel tank has two vents on top - one has been blocked off (with a bolt and a hose clamp). The other connects to a metal pipe line that runs across the car, just behind the tank, suspended off the underside of the load bed, then stops inside the side vents in the body (in front of the rear wheels). Presumably fumes are meant to vent out the side of the car.

    In busses I've had a long time ago the fuel vents went into a charcoal canister that presumably filtered the fumes and vented into the top of the air cleaner box.

    On the single cab, should both fuel tank vents be open?

    Should they flow to a charcoal canister or do they vent straight out the side like the current one? (The metal line that's there looks original)

    If they did originally run through a charcoal canister, how important is it to reinstate that?

    I have an old charcoal canister from a donor car (a 76 bus - it's a ) which I could probably rig up. Would it still be OK to use after 44 years?

    Where should I mount it and which way up does it go?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Wayne murray

    Wayne murray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,728
    Location:
    Seven hills
    http://forums.kombiclub.com/threads/bay-ute-tank-breathing-system.58724/
    Given you a link to what I did to my 76 SC Ute and also my 72 DC Ute go by the 76 ute as it would be the same as yours,I've used both fuel tank vents and connected them as one and then vented to the outside by the same as what you have described in your post. Getting the Y shape rubber hose is difficult to get and is ute specific. Got spare one if you need one. What you have the long metal line has been bent to suit what ever the person had to fix the leak and the Y rubber is hard to get so that's why it was done.
     
  3. kr.au

    kr.au New Member

    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Brisbane

    Thanks @wayne - you've saved me again! This is exactly what I need to know and I'll definitely be following your lead. Would love to get hold of that spare Y shape hose - am obviously willing to fix you up for it. What's the best way to make that happen?

    Follow up question: I assume you are not using the charcoal canister that was standard in the busses? Have you just plugged the holes in the top-left of the fan cowling and air filter box where it also connected?
     
  4. Wayne murray

    Wayne murray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,728
    Location:
    Seven hills
    I've never had a charcoal canister and not sure whether all buses had them,or did utes?! Does you Ute had or have a canister on it? I've also got 1600 upright engines that have been worked slightly.
    I'll send a PM
     
  5. kr.au

    kr.au New Member

    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Thanks @Wayne murray. The 76 bus that is donating my motor (2ltr) had one mounted to the firewall. I took on my single cab as a rolling shell with no motor - so no idea what was there originally.

    BTW - I've just found this page ( http://www.vw-resource.com/air_cleaner.html ) that explains the 'Evaporative Emission Control' and answers my earlier questions:

    "The Bentley Manual says "the activated charcoal filtering canister must be replaced after each 48,000 miles or two years, whichever comes first."" - which means a 46 year old unit is definitely out of service; and

    "If you have disabled the evaporative emission control system (as many people have), the outlet nozzle on the fan housing and the inlet nozzle on the air cleaner must be plugged. Otherwise valuable cooling air is lost, and the vacuum inside the air cleaner cannot be maintained.

    I'm convinced now to leave it off and plug the holes. Will respond to your PM.
     

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