1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

tyres versus tyres

Discussion in 'Performance' started by chris taylor, Jun 4, 2014.

  1. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,802
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Nice when a purchase decision gives pleasure :)

    Lot of people tolerating bad tyres/shocks/gear selection/starting etc thinking its 'normal' in a kombi.

    One thing fixed gives enthusiasm to tackle one more item.
    i should also take my own advice :lol:

    cheers
    col
     
  2. sacky

    sacky Member

    Messages:
    306
    Location:
    melbourne
    How true cbus im on a roll new sliding door rubber and new Dunlop Silca com tyres, kombi feels like new and they recommend running 38psi all round. You guys are spot on running the right size tyres are a must, can't
    believe the difference plus safe and legal. I may even get more bag for my buck on fuel.
     
  3. tomar

    tomar Member

    Messages:
    171
    Location:
    Burpengary
    I have Bridgestone LT tyres. They were on Floyd when I bought him. The previous owner swears by them,said that they were at least 25% quieter than conventional tyres. I have no trouble with the steering being heavy , body roll or wandering and I travelled 5,000 klms at Christmas and enjoyed every minute.I will also say that there has been a lot of mechanical work done before I purchased Floyd.
     
  4. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,802
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Hi sacky.
    Glad its giving the good feeling:)
    try a bit lower in the front tyres. will be a bit more comfortable and give better grip without compromising handling .
    parking effect may be slightly greater but other than that you wont notice much difference between 38 and 32 except for the comfort and better 'feel' due to better grip.
    If a tyre feels 'hard' or a bit 'bouncy' on road then grip is compromised in my opinion.
    A seat of pants method for anyone who can feel it is to increase pressures till the hardness or bounce is just felt then drop pressures under this by 2psi. this would be the top pressure for most sustained speed driving. drop another 2 psi if you need comfort around town.

    a more accurate way is drive at hwy speeds for 50km or so and check temps across the tyre with an infra red thermometer . looking for equall temps across the tyre

    Dont think many tyre places understand rear engines vans .


    cheers
    col
     
  5. sacky

    sacky Member

    Messages:
    306
    Location:
    melbourne
    Hi cbus
    Thanks for the advise will do a Hwy run as they are, then drop the front to 36 and go from there. See Briank runs 36 F 38 R maybe the way to go, happy travels coming up.
     
  6. Lois lane

    Lois lane Active Member

    Messages:
    263
    Location:
    The Oaks
    I just had a quick look at the original VW Transporter instruction manual we have dated 1975 (August edition)
    and the tyre pressures for 185R 14C says front 30psi, rear fully loaded 44-46 for both micro bus and delivery van.
    :)
     
  7. Aspro

    Aspro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,268
    Location:
    Stuck in the UK
    Tyres have come a long way since the 70's. Best to check with the individual manufacturers specs rather than follow a 40 year old manual.
     
  8. Lois lane

    Lois lane Active Member

    Messages:
    263
    Location:
    The Oaks
    True that :)
     
  9. KombiFringe

    KombiFringe Member

    Messages:
    151
    Location:
    melbourne
    I just travelled for 10 weeks around Tassie on Lt tyres, it was bouncy and noisy..thanks i will go for more conventional tyres and will look at the ones saky got.
    I have a question to CBus can I go to Tucker Road motors, for all my mechanical stuff, and ask for stabilisers to be fitted?? The older mechanic, The Dad, said I need new ball joints next service, can new ball joints and stabilisers give me a better, safer ride.
     
  10. cbus

    cbus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,802
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Dont know Tucker road motors so cant advise. If you trust them and they are confident on kombis i see no problem. Kombi specific mechanics can be better if dealing with engine issues but suspension wise any GOOD mechanic will have a good idea ,generaly :)

    check with local kombi owners re tuckers and/or alternative recomended good mechanics. If the Dad has picked the ball joints [upper and lower suspension joints, not to be confused with tie rod ends] then he knows what he is doing as many mechanics dont test them.
    Also sounds as if he is lookin out for you soa good thing .
    repair the ball joints. .....................this is a basic starting point .


    Dont worry about stabilisers[sway bars] yet.
    You should have one already fitted to front . check it isnt broken and that mounting rubbers are in good nick.

    If you were 'bouncy and noisy' where was it originating ?
    most likely knocking in front is your ball joints. [can also be loose wheelnuts or slack in steering /worn steering rod joints
    harshness may be tyre pressures too high .
    bouncing and sway are usaly related to stuffed shock absorbers.

    Few things to check on your tyres.
    how old are they and what brand? Do they look like truck tyres.
    stick your fingernail into tread and see how soft the rubber is.
    if it feels like plastic compared to a new car tyre its probably old and a hard compound. these afford very little grip in an emergency.
    Another check is , do they easily slip a bit on wet roundabouts . they shouldnt but a lot do.

    Talk to your mechanic for another input re existing tyres
    if they are old or hard and a very cheap or truck like LT tyre then put new tyres on the list at some stage in the future.

    In the mean time check your tyre pressures. try 32 front and 38 rear.

    more on tyres later

    checklist for safety and handling:
    *check tyres for age and compound hardness. Tyre size and are they a mixed lot? Tyre brand/type. ...............set pressures. 32 f 38 R
    *check operation of brakes [You or mechanic]
    *check tyres for signs of uneven wear. [This will show alignment /tyre pressure issues]
    *check operation of shock absorbers.[good shocks make a huge difference but dont make up for worn mechanical parts]
    *check front sway bar is intact.
    *repair ball joints. this will include a wheel alignment. have them check front and rear.
    *at sametime as ball joints done he should check and replace or repack wheel bearings, check bearings inside beam tubes. check all tie rods and steering joints. stering box. replace rubber joiner between steering column and steering box unless new or real good condition.

    this will give a good basis for any other improvements

    improvements may be , better tyres, heavy duty shocks.

    will add tyres and shocks later

    col
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2014
  11. jon ward

    jon ward Active Member

    Messages:
    5,752
    Location:
    Travelling Australia
    Someone mentioned load ratings earlier and they said that 95 is adequate, that is incorrect.
    A kombi is a commercial vehicle even if its a micro or a campmobile, therefore the correct tyre and correct load rating is 185R14 with a load rating no less than 101/100.
    I have been selling tyres and in particular Toyo tyres for roughly 8 years now and would recommend the Toyo H08 to everyone, more than few members have come from near and far for me to fit the H08 for them.
    Col is also very correct with his list of problems a 30+ year old kombi has in regards to the front end.
    99% of problems is from sloppy tie rods,flogged out ball joints and incorrect tyre pressures.

    There is no such thing as a dumb question!
     
  12. KombiFringe

    KombiFringe Member

    Messages:
    151
    Location:
    melbourne
    Thanks for the list and input.
    This Forum and Club is invaluable for me.
    Gratitude to the Administrators and Mods and the Members who actively participate…
    When I pay mechanics to do things I like to research and try to understand what they are doing talking about… So I can engage in the conversation and know what's going on for my bus.
    I used to fix my FC Holden and had a few lessons from the club.
    I am asking are there any group lessons that I could go to now? Steve, guy I bought the bus from, showed me how to change the oil. I have done that, but this might be lessons on what to look for, like the list above, or how to Know your bus is too hot even if the light never comes on...
    Thanks Everyone I am a very Noob at Bus Stuff….
     
  13. deepburn13

    deepburn13 Member

    Messages:
    257
    Location:
    Adelaide
    I second that!!! I too was a noob 2 years ago when I bought my 72 bus, but thanks to this forum and all of its contributors I can now work my way around most problems and am able to service my bus as well as improve my bus to prevent problems. Much gratitude!
    Cheers,
    Scott
     
  14. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,741
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    tyres

    Hi there Lois Lane, it is good to read your input into this tyre versus tyre conversation, but the thing that bothers me is if one gets the pressures to low in the front you could end up tyres that will run hot, heavier steering and abnormal wear, the very things that I personally am trying to avoid, I think that 30 PSI is to low for this type of tyre. I am currently [as Brian recommended } running 36 and 38, but might go as low as 34 frt but certainly no lower than that , but having said that , what suits me and my van may not suit you and your van as every van is slightly different { as in weight and load distribution} as well your own personal driving comfort. Thanks for your input, Regards , Chris.
     
  15. chenko

    chenko Member

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Sydney
    i was told not to bother with LT tyres (in fact was quite emphatic as it being unnecessary) and just get a reasonable set of normal tyres with right specs

    also suggested to just run 36psi all round in my micro but i have compromised with 34/38 for now but will be experimenting with different pressures

    this from a well known bus guru
     
  16. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,741
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    :mad:why is it that when I go to post a comment it tells me that I am not allowed to even though I have logged in successfully, spent 15 minutes typing a reply {twice} and both times have been rejected, unhappy chappy :mad:
     
  17. chris taylor

    chris taylor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,741
    Location:
    adelaide sth aust
    remember , when buying tyres for your best mate keep in mind that it is a commercial type vehicle[ weight wise ]not a passenger car and the tyres should be suitable for it
     
  18. chenko

    chenko Member

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Sydney
    is there a big difference in weight compared to say a modern transporter or a toyota torago?
    again (i am just passing it along what i have been told) point made to me was it was a passenger car (no camper here) and to treat it as such
     
  19. Tangles

    Tangles Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    681
    Location:
    On the road somewhere
    Whoever told you this was probably just plain wrong, and didn't really know a lot about kombis, but may know lots about other cars. If you ever have the joy of looking into a history of the kombi, you will realise that right from their inception, they were intended as an urban delivery van. Hence why the early ones were never designed for highway speeds, only urban speeds. It wasn't until VW realised that people were using their delivery vans as campers, tourers and people movers (ugh! I hate that phrase) that they started kitting out the interiors differently for different purposes. However, they didn't redesign the basis of the kombi, which was still a van designed to carry a tonne of cargo around town, albeit with different interior options.

    The fact that they have told you to run the same pressure all round is a bit worrying too. This is fine on a modern van (ie the torago you mentioned earlier), but all of these vans have the engine at the front. Weight distribution is different for a kombi and no matter how much better modern tyres are, the engine in a kombi is still at the back and the back tyres need to carry a bit more of the load.

    However, modern passenger car tyres can still fit and work.

    PS. Jon Ward is the guru.
     
  20. chenko

    chenko Member

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Sydney
    i can assure you he is a bus guru and very well known and respected.......i can only comment about what he said in relation to me getting new tyres for my bus and what he actually said he does for his own
    i am not going to get into a he said he said but seems there are differences in opinion even amongst the experts when it comes to tyres
     

Share This Page